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5 Behaviors of an Alcoholic (And When to Get Help)

These Are the Classic Behaviors of an Alcoholic Who Needs Help

One of the largest areas of research concerning alcoholism is how this addiction affects the personality of an individual. In fact, the behaviors of an alcoholic are usually quite distinct. Here are five behaviors of an alcoholic that you should look for if you're concerned about a family member or close friend struggling with this disease:

  1. Irresponsibility

One of the behaviors of an alcoholic to look out for is irresponsibility. The individual may forget things like picking a family member up from school or work or stopping at the store on the way home. They may be late for work, forget to pay bills, or shirk household responsibilities. Finally, they will often become irritable if their lack of responsibility is mentioned to them

  1. Abuse

Sadly, abuse is common among alcoholics. If the individual struggling with alcoholism is a parent, they may be abusing their children. Spousal abuse is not uncommon either.

  1. Lying

Many individuals who struggle with alcoholism are somewhat aware that they have a problem, and they will try to hide it as best they can. Lying is a hallmark of alcoholism and other substance abuse problems.

  1. Making Excuses

Often, those struggling with alcoholism will end up making excuses for their drinking. They will say that they needed a drink because they're stressed from work. They'll make excuses to go to the bar with friends. They'll make excuses for drinking too much.

This is all in an effort to hide the fact that they are struggling with an alcohol addiction problem from friends and family members. They also may be trying to hide it from themselves.

  1. Blame

Finally, one of the last behaviors of an alcoholic that you may notice is constant blaming. Again, in an effort to avoid confronting their substance abuse problem, they will shift the blame. It will be so-and-so's fault that they have to drink so much. It will be the stress at work. It will be their boss or the government or their family members. It's never that they have a problem with drinking.

What Is a Functional Alcoholic?

If you don't know what is a functional alcoholic is, it's someone who abuses alcohol but is able to live a semi-normal life. They often hold down a job, act congenial with family and friends, and exercise and eat healthy. But they also drink to excess on a regular basis.

There are not as many signs of a functioning alcoholic because again, they're able to keep up a fairly normal exterior. With that said, certain signs can be seen. If you are close enough to an individual, you may be able to see some of the following common signs of a functioning alcoholic:

  • Making excuses for drinking
  • Drinking in the middle of the day
  • Not going a day without drinking
  • Pretending like they are ill when really they are sick from drinking
  • Hiding alcohol

Knowing When It's Time to Seek Help

If you have a close friend or family member who has shown any of the signs listed above, it may be time to seek professional help for them. Often times, the individual themselves cannot see that they are struggling with an addiction.

At this point, intervention may be necessary, or you might consider speaking to your friend or family member one-on-one about your concerns. Either way, it's important that this individual gets professional help immediately so that the addiction does not worsen.

Contact Drug Treatment Centers Doylestown

Drug Treatment Centers Doylestown if a resource available to anyone who is struggling with substance abuse issues and anyone who has a loved one who is struggling with these issues. If you would like to learn more about alcoholism treatment or if you would like to find a treatment center near you, call us today at (215) 383-2668.

We will connect you with one of our addiction specialists right away and tell you about your options. It's never too late to seek professional help for an alcohol addiction. If you need help, got it today.

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